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  • The content on this site is free, as is, no derivatives can be patented - this copyright is recursive, derivatives can not make it more restrictive. Please read the full legal disclaimer

  • "Practical Design Patterns in C" is a hands-on book about a way of putting (commercial) software together

  • Basic approaches are small, simple and generic descriptions of how a potential solution to a problem can be found. Find in this section a sampling of such approaches cast in a concrete problem-solution context that demonstrates the mechanics of the process

  • Software Construction section is a two-part tutorial exploring the incremental approach. The first part is an Arithmetic Expressions Calculator implementation based on the Shunting Yard algorithm with an interactive visualization applet. The second part is an adaptation of the same algorithm for Boolean Expressions Evaluator For Strings

  • g is a small and simple language that I use to record the solutions to straight edge and compass construction problems

  • Experiments section deals with my experiments with problem solving where I put my solution paths to various problems on public display

  • In Triangle section I record the many ways in which this ubiquitous geometric object can be constructed

  • Inversion is a section dedicated to inversion of a real plane with respect to a circle. Inversion in a complex plane with respect to a circle and inversion with respect to a sphere are in the works

  • Gear Clocks is a three-chapter book on the fundamentals of the inner workings of these beautiful objects. Find here a mix of a large amount of mathematics and physics along with practical instructions

  • Kombinatorix Primordial is an introductory tutorial that gathers all the basic combinatorial counting principles in one place painting one, hopefully, coherent picture of the subject.

  • This site was created on OpenSuse with vi and tested with Firefox. The geometric drawings were done with GeoGebra, OpenSCAD and GIMP, the tables - with LibreOffice. The math is rendered by MathJax via a secure server

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First published January 26 2013